MG-social-media-logo-yellow.jpg

Hi.

Welcome to Mothergood Co., a lifestyle website for millennial mothers. We believe there is more than one way to be a good mother.

Adjusting to Life, as a Stay-at-Home Mom

Adjusting to Life, as a Stay-at-Home Mom

By: Danaé Overman

Once Upon a Time, I was a 20-something working woman with a full time job.  I had a social life filled with friends, church, and volunteer activities, and a husband who I loved going out with any day of the week.  My weekdays were filled from morning to night with work, lunch dates with coworkers, dinner, and TV with my husband. I talked with friends every chance I got.  

Weekends were even busier, as I’d see my parents, run errands with my husband, and have get-togethers with coworkers and friends.  Basically, my days were jam packed with as much hustle and bustle (and people) as possible and, frankly, that’s just how I liked it. The more people the better. I’m a typical example of a true extrovert. I love to have as much social interaction as possible.

Fast forward a few years later, and I’m a stay-at-home-mom with two kids under two. My days of socialization were exchanged for equally busy days.  But, now, I spent my time reading to my toddler, cuddling my infant, and changing and feeding both. Don’t get me wrong, I adore and love my children.  Yet, never leaving the house left me feeling isolated and alone. The things I used to do without thinking, such as grocery shopping or going to a coffee shop, became more difficult.  Instead of exerting the effort of packing up a diaper bag for two and getting two kids down a flight of stairs to exit our apartment, I stopped trying to get out altogether.

To some, staying home all week sounds like a dream.  But, to an extrovert, the lack of social interaction was certainly not ideal.  There were days when I would countdown to 6PM (when my husband gets home from work), just so that I would have someone to talk to.  I would spend half of the day texting friends who could only sporadically text back because they were at work. Finally, I realized I had to make some changes that would require a lot of effort in the beginning, but benefited me greatly mentally and physically.

Staying at home full time can be adjustment, but, once you find your groove, can be very rewarding. Take inventory of what is working for you and what isn’t, and adjust accordingly. Read my article, 5 Tips for the Extroverted Stay-at-Home Mom, for my recommendations on how to make the adjustment go smoothly.

 

 

Mothergood Feature: Francie Broghammer, MD

Mothergood Feature: Francie Broghammer, MD

Motherhood May Surprise You

Motherhood May Surprise You